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Jun 11, 2021

Covishield vaccine little risky of bleeding disorders: Study

Foreign Affairs News Desk
A nurse giving shot of CoviShield to a woman. Quartz Photo
A nurse giving shot of CoviShield to a woman. Quartz Photo

Reports of rare clotting and bleeding disorders in younger adults, some fatal, led a number of countries to limit the vaccine’s use to older people, and a few to drop it altogether.

According to Denise Grady’s report in New York Times, the new study found that the AstraZeneca vaccine was linked to a slight increase in the risk of a disorder called immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) which can cause bruising in some cases but also serious bleeding in others.

People receiving the COVID vaccine made by Oxford-AstraZeneca also known as CoviShield in India had a slightly increased risk of a bleeding disorder and possibly other rare blood problems, researchers reported.

The AstraZeneca vaccine is not authorized for use in the United States, but it has been authorized by the European Medicines Agency, the European Union’s top drug regulator, as well as many countries outside the bloc.

 But reports of rare clotting and bleeding disorders in younger adults, some fatal, led a number of countries to limit the vaccine’s use to older people, and a few to drop it altogether.

The new study found that the AstraZeneca vaccine was linked to a slight increase in the risk of a disorder called ITP which can cause bruising in some cases but also serious bleeding in others.

The risk was estimated at 1.13 cases per 100,000 people receiving their first dose, up to 27 days after vaccination. That estimate would be in addition to the typical incidence in the United Kingdom, before the vaccine came into use, which was estimated at six to nine cases per 100,000.

However, the study found no increased risk of the blood disorders with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, Grady’s report further described.

The condition is treatable, and none of the cases in vaccine recipients were fatal, the researchers said. They emphasized that the benefits of the vaccine far outweighed the small risk, and noted that COVID itself is far more likely than the vaccine to cause ITP.

But the researchers also wrote that even though the risks from the AstraZeneca vaccine were small, “alternative vaccines for individuals at low COVID-19 risk might be warranted when supply allows.”

It is not surprising to find ITP in a few vaccine recipients, the researchers said, noting that small increases in the risk have also occurred with the vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, and the shots for hepatitis B and flu.

African Goal 

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) has predicted that nine in 10 African nations likely to miss the September target of vaccinating 10 per cent of their populations against COVID-19.

Just 2 % of the African continent’s nearly 1.3 billion people have received one dose, and only 9.4 million Africans are fully vaccinated. The continent needs 225 million doses of vaccines.

The pandemic “is trending upwards in 10 African countries”. Four nations have seen a 30 per cent increase in cases. Most of the new cases were in Egypt, South Africa, Tunisia, Uganda and Zambia and over half were in nine southern African countries. As vaccines have become “increasingly scarce” only seven African nations will meet the goal of immunizing one in 10 people by September. 

People over 70 were 800 times more at risk of severe disease or death from the coronavirus, he continued, insisting that it was an “urgent priority” to continue to protect the elderly, people with comorbidities and frontline workers who “remain unprotected” in a number of European countries. 

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